RK wonders if the Old Woman losing memory

By Mary K. Hamner
Journal Correspondent


RK can't understand some of the finer points of gardening, but he's prety smart anyway.
I wonder if the old woman's a loosin it! I heard her say early this mornin, " I have got to find a place for Molly." She was lookin straight at a pot settin on our front porch with this puzzled look on her face. Since I didn't see no human there I could only guess she was a talkin about the plant in the pot. She's been doin that a lot and it's a getting a little worrisome to me Molly, exochorda, or pearl bush arrived last week, a gift from Molly, one of the bulb diggers who come to visit every year. Why she don't just call it by its real name is a mystery to me.

I learned early on that the old woman doesn't go around broadcastin her age. Plenty nine is all she tells folks that ask. But when she calls a plant by a human name, I wonder if her age has something to do with it, is her memory a slippin.

Like she has a lot of Virginias around. She talks to herself a wonderin if Virginia will come back this year. From what I hear Virginia died several years back, but the old woman stands over a dead lookin stem almost prayin that Virginia will come back this spring. Never could find Virginia in the plant reference book but once somebody called her a root beer plant.

I saw the old woman get excited last week when she saw Virginia(2) coming up in another area. How anybody could confuse Crinum Americanum, or swamp lily with Virginia(1) is hard to say but at least she has been resurrected in one area.

Sunshine's scattered around the place too. Weige'la out front gets a lot of attention when she begins putting on leaves in the spring. Sunshine is a resource for replacement of the Virgina(1) if the old one doesn't come back. Wonder what the old woman will call it then.

There's a new arrival sittin in the kitchen window and she calls it Vivian. " Now Vivian, you need to come on now and live," she says. " I am following all the instructions that came with you and I want you to thrive". Course I know that the plant is an episcia, Pink Acajou and they are kin to African Violets. If the plant dies, it will be because it doesn't know who it is now.

Actually, I need to be more respectful of the old woman and not make fun of her memory like this. After what happened to me last week, I know without a doubt that my eyes are not really up to snuff. It was dark when I caught that critter a thinkin it was a rat-- But only after I had killed it, dragged it up into the garage, and had the top half for breakfast, did l realize what I had done. I had eaten Alonzo, the friendly neighborhood rabbit.

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